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CJK Input Methods

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Chinese Input Methods

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Pinyin

Pinyin Pin1yin1 is the official romanization system for Mandarin Chinese.  It was promulgated in 1958 and has been a United Nations standard since 1977.

Type the pronunciation and select the character from the list displayed on the input bar:
 
input bar
 
Click it or type its number.  You may also press the space bar to select the first character.
 
Pinyin ü is typed as u, uu or v, depending on the application you use.  Pinyin üe is invaraiably ue.
 
Some applications let you input compounds and phrases in addition to individual characters.  This makes typing Chinese much faster:
 
example
 
There are some applications in which you may or have to specify the tone:
 
Pinyin tones
Tone numbers should be typed at the end of the syllable: zhong1 wen2.

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Quanpin

The meaning of Quanpin Quan2pin1 depends on what other input methods you have.  If you have Pinyin and Quanpin then you must type the tone numbers in Pinyin but not in Quanpin.  If you have Quanpin and Shuangpin then Quanpin is full Pinyin (with or without tones) and Shuangpin is abbreviated Pinyin.

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Shuangpin

Shuangpin Shuang1pin1 is two-letter Pinyin.  Every syllable is analyzed into an onset and a rhyme.  An onset is an initial consonant and a rhyme is what follows.  Every onset and every rhyme is represented by exactly one letter, eg. Shuangpin is written as 'udpn'.  One-letter onsets and one-letter rhymes are typed as in standard Pinyin.  This is how you abbreviate digraph onsets:

Pinyin ch sh zh
Shuangpin i u v

If a syllable starts with a vowel then it has a silent onset.  Different applications use different keystrokes to mark a silent onset, eg. an apostrophe ( ' ) or letter o.

The keystrokes for complex rhymes are application-specific.  Read the help file of your application.

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Zhuyin

Zhuyin zhu4yin1, also known as Bopomofo, is a non-Roman transcription system derived from character strokes.  It was adopted in 1913 and is still used in Taiwan.  Click here to learn Zhuyin.  View a typical Zhuyin keyboard.

The Zhuyin input method is used to type hanzi han4zi4.  To type Zhuyin, use the Symbols input method. 

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Cangjie

Cangjie Cang1jie2 is a fast input method that identifies characters by their shape.  It was developed by Zhu Bangfu Zhu1 Bang1fu4 in Taiwan and is named after the legendary inventor of Chinese writing.

Learn Cangjie and other input methods from Dylan Sung.

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Wubi

Wubi Wu3bi3 is another input method by shape.  It is very popular in mainland China.

Learn Wubi from Joe Wicentowski.

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Symbols

Fuhao Fu2hao4: any full-width character that is not a hanzi han4zi4 is referred to as a symbol in Chinese information processing.  Symbols include letters, numbers, punctuation marks, iconic symbols, etc.  You can input symbols through pop-up keyboards or character maps.

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Japanese Input Methods

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Rômaji

Rômaji: type the pronunciation in Hepburn (or other) romanization and select your kana kana or kanji kanji from the list displayed on the input bar:

input bar

Click it or type its number.  The first item may also be selected by pressing the space bar.

Input commonly used compounds and phrases as units:

example

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Kana to Kanji

Type hiragana hiragana and select your kana kana or kanji kanji from the list displayed on the input bar.

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Symbols Input

Kigô Kigô: any full-width character that is not a kana kana or kanji kanji is referred to as a symbol in Japanese information processing.  Symbols include letters, numbers, punctuation marks, iconic symbols, etc.  You can input symbols through pop-up keyboards or character maps.

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Korean Input Methods

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Jamo to Hangul

Type jamo jamo to get hangul hangul syllables:

example
View a typical Korean keyboard.

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Jamo to Hanja

Type jamo jamo and press the han button to get hanja hanja:

example
View a typical Korean keyboard.

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Symbols Input

Input full-width letters, numbers, punctuation marks, icons and other symbols through pop-up keyboards or character maps.

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Radical Lookup

Click the radical of your character in the pop-up window, give the number of strokes and select your character from the list.

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© Gyula Zsigri

[CJK]  [Home]

August 7, 2000